Acclaimed mystery novelist Peter Robertson

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In a remote wilderness, mysterious secrets and sinister forces are unleashed in Peter Robertson’s new novel, Conclusion, a heart-pounding literary thriller coming from Gibson House Press in October 2019.
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Colorblind, the final volume in the trilogy that began with Permafrost and continued in Mission, finds Tom in New Orleans, where two interlocking deaths and the trail of an iconic folk singer take him to the underbelly of the Crescent City. This time Tom’s hunches let him down, forcing him to face hard truths.
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When a second drowned homeless man is pulled from flooded Boulder Creek, Tom’s sense of unease kicks in again with a vengeance. In this sequel to Permafrost, the precarious world of the Colorado mountain town’s homeless population becomes a focus for the semi-retired businessman and a victim pool for a driven killer.
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Two friends grew up together in Scotland. Now one is missing in Northern Michigan and the other, a successful businessman, has time on his hands. The hunt for the lost man begins as a mystery and evolves into an act of redemption.
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Peter Robertson was born and raised in Edinburgh, Scotland, graduated from the University of East Anglia in the U.K., and came to the U.S. at age 23. After traveling in the States, he settled in Chicago, where he has been a book reviewer, stay-at-home dad, soccer coach, and teacher. An enthusiastic bicyclist and guitar player, Robertson is married and the father of two adult children. Robertson’s travels in the U.S. flavor the setting of his books. Canoeing and camping trips in the Minnesota Boundary Waters inspired the setting for a primary section of Conclusion. His mystery novels have been described as “distinctly and compellingly untraditional in their flavor and tone.” Permafrost was praised as “skillfully written and, ultimately, deeply satisfying”; Mission as “a successful follow-up”; and Colorblind as “artful, realistic, and poignant in just the right places.”